Summer Topics courses

ARTS 291 ST: RETHINKING POP CULTURE
May 20 - July 10, Online | Wolfgang

 

BIOL 391 TOP: THE NATURAL HISTORY OF THE JAMES RIVER WATERSHED
May 20 - June 7 TBA | Carr

This expedition will expose the students to the importance of the James River watershed to the residents of Virginia in the present, past, and future. This collaborative, experiential learning opportunity combines faculty from the Biology Department, the Center for Environmental Studies, and the Outdoor Adventure Program. By immersing students in a natural landscape prominent in Virginia’s history for a month, camping and canoeing through the watershed and down the river, this program represents a unique opportunity for students at VCU to learn about human history, natural history and how the two have shaped each other. The 2019 course will be 6 credits, BIOL391 and ENVS491. There are no prerequisites required beyond a good attitude and willingness to spend three weeks outside.

The goals for each student will be to learn more about the specific features that make up this river system by identifying and stimulating individual ownership of particular issues of interest. During this journey the participants will be engaged with a wide variety of hands-on interactions, guided by faculty from multiple departments and contributing guest experts. Students will learn and practice camping, canoeing, kayaking, and outdoor living skills, including Leave No Trace camping. Students will be instructed in expedition management, group dynamics, and leadership skills. For more information, please contact Daniel Carr at carrdf@vcu.edu and visit: https://rampages.us/footprintsonthejames/

 

BIOZ 491 TOP: ANIMAL BEHAVIOR LAB
May 21 - July 11, TR 1 - 4:35 p.m. | MOORE

 

CRAF 491 TOP: HOT GLASS FABRICATION
May 20 - June 7, M-F 9 a.m. - Noon | Wax

This three week concentrated glass fabrication class will introduce students to a myriad of ways to realize and articulate their ideas. An open ended and free flowing facilitation of each individual student's path towards acquiring the visual vocabulary they need to express coherent fluency with glass is its goal. The visual language explored will focus mainly on hot-glass-fabrication processes that range from ancient historical techniques to the re-invention-of-the-wheel in terms of applying pixelated-imagery to the surfaces of our materials. No prior experience is necessary.

 

CRAF 491 TOP: DES II STU APPLIED DYE INTENSIVE
May 20 - June 20, MTWR 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. | Pfaff

This class provides an in depth exploration of various pattern dyeing techniques as well as a variety of dye stuffs (both synthetic and natural). Working with natural fiber fabrics, you will plan and fully execute designs for a finished product. This will be geared to your area of study, either a utilitarian object (garment, accessory, home furnishing, quilt) or art object (2D or 3D). A materials fee of $45 covers dyes and fabric for samples. Students will be responsible for purchasing fabric for their final project.

 

ECON 491 TOP: GLOBAL FINANCIAL HISTORY
June 10 - July 10, M-F 10:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. | Seay

 

ENGR 291 SP TOP: MACHINE SHOP I, NOVICE
May 20 - June 7, TR 8-8:50 a.m. | Solomonov

 

ENVS 491 ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF STATISTICS
June 10 - July 18 MTWR 1-2:40 p.m. | Albrecht-Mallinger

This course will provide a foundation in basic statical theory using environmental data and topics. Students will learn how the concepts of central tendency, population, probability, and uncertainty are critical to pressing issues in conservation, climate change, and human health. In addition to analytical skills, the class will provide an introduction to public data hosted by the Center for Disease Control, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, and other institutions. Students will learn how to access and manage these data to ask pertinent environmental questions with hypothesis testing using t-tests, ANOVAs, chi-squares, regressions, and generalized linear models.

 

ENVS 491 T: EXPEDITION PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT
May 20 - June 7 | MTWRFSU 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. | Schmidt

This expedition class explores the intersection of human and natural history in the James River and its watershed. By immersing themselves in this environment, students will experience this intersection firsthand, learning the landscape that shaped the development of many cultures, including our city, state and nation. Taught in tandem with BIOL 391 The Natural History of the James River Watershed, ENVS491 encourages students to work as team members and provides introduction to expedition management, group dynamics, and leadership skills. Students will learn best practices for frontcountry and backcountry camping, outdoor living skills, multi-day canoeing and kayaking methods and practical application of Leave No Trace principles. These will be assessed periodically by the review of reflection and observation journal entries and cumulatively by a final practical exam. https://rampages.us/footprintsonthejames/

 

ENVS 591 Environmental Chemistry
June 10 - July 31 | MW 6-8 p.m. | Kelly

Course Description and Goals: During this course you will study the chemistry of air, water, and toxic organic compounds as well as how anthropogenic activities affect this chemistry on planet Earth. Specifically, we will examine the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species found in air and water as well as the effects of technology thereon. This course is divided into 4 major parts that reflects the most pressing issues in Environmental Chemistry today: (1) Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution; (2) Climate Change and Energy; (3) Water Chemistry and Water Pollution; and (4) Toxic Organic Compounds. All students who take this course are expected to demonstrate a mastery of all topics through successful completion of quizzes, problem sets, and exams.  Recommended prerequisite: CHEM 101 and 102.

ENVS 591 TOPIC: ENV APP OF DRONE TECHNOLOGY (1 cr)
July 29 - July 30 | 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. | Shuart

ENVS 591 TOPIC: APPLICATION OF DRONE TECHNOLOGY (3 cr)
July 29 - August 2, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. | Shuart

Students will become familiar with the application of UAS and their related technologies to understand how to apply them in environmental analysis and visualization. The two day course will focus on UAS platforms, flight planning, regulations and use of drones, data collection and processing, and spatial fidelity and how global positioning systems (GPS) increase viability of UAS data. In wrapping up the two day course, students will understand how to process UAS data and the products derived from those collections. The five day course will showcase various UAS technologies and data collection in the field. Students will also gain experience publishing final orthophotos, photogrammetric point clouds, elevation models, and 3D meshes to the web for dissemination and consumption. Full motion video and capturing geospatial data from UAS’s will be explored. Students will be exposed to open source and proprietary software to process and interrogate UAV data.

ENVS 591 TOPIC: DIVERSITY IN SCIENCE AND THE ENVIRONMENT
June 10 - July 18, MTWR 10:30 a.m. -12:10 p.m. | Fox

When students think of diversity in science and the environment, they usually think about things like genetic diversity, population diversity, of ecosystem diversity. However, science and the environment must consider problems of complex systems from the perspective of a modern approach to science that depends upon the quality of the “community of scholars” who explore it. As we have studied the community of scholars, we have found a need to consider the problem of diversity of thinking that comes with a more diversified “community.” This class will explore a philosophy of science approach to scientific methodology and ask questions about the importance of diversity among those who theorize and test our understanding of the natural world. This will lead to our reading about varied approaches to science and the environment from different racial, ethnic and gender perspectives. We will then look for ways to better use “community diversity” to create a more justifiable scientific project.

The class will involve reading, discussion, and writing. Students will read for each and write short papers reacting to the readings. These reactions will be explored in class discussion. A short mid-term summary paper and a more extensive final paper will be required. This class will be very useful to serious undergraduates and graduate students who want to expand their thinking about the scientific method and/or the role of human/social in our understanding of the world.

ENVS 591 TOPIC: TOXIC SITE ASSESSMENT: GEOCHEMICAL APPROACH
May 20 - June 20, MTWR 1 - 3:15 p.m. | Sikder

This course is designed to expose the participants to the procedure and protocol of toxic site assessment and the understanding the critical issues of chemical behavior of toxic and/or heavy metals in the environment. The assessments of the toxic sites are a tool to determine the risk to human health and environment due to the release of past and current contaminants. The site assessments are performed under various regulations to support the decision-makers in selection of cost-effective cleanup procedure.

 

ENVS 591 TOPIC: ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
May 21 - July 11, TR 6-8:40 p.m. | Fox

This is a seminar for advanced undergraduates and graduate students that will focus on questions of environmental ethics. This is a relatively new field of inquiry, and is, in many ways, still defining its ground. Therefore, this will allow us to engage in discussions of some of the most exciting questions facing environmental studies today; from animal rights to questions of technology and development. However, we will begin by grounding ourselves in the broader ethical tradition and a philosophy of science understanding science within the new arena of environmental ethics.

The class will involve reading, discussion, and writing. Students will read each week and write short papers reacting to the readings. These reactions will be explored in class discussion. At mid-term we will look at the ethical elements in two of the classics of environmental writing, Sand County Almanac and Silent Spring. The class will also require a final paper. This class will be stimulating for serious undergraduate students, as well as graduate students.

 

GDES 391 TOP: TECHNIQUES OF SCREEN PRINTING
May 20 - June 7, M-F 9 a.m. - Noon | Wright
Students will learn the basics of screen-printing through straightforward techniques and DIY applications that demonstrate how screen-printing can be an accessible addition to the designer’s toolkit. The class will focus on hand techniques for screen preparation, file preparation for digital screens and then advancing to multi-layered editions. Students will be urged to explore applications that relate to their life and practice beyond traditional paper editions. It is our goal at the end of the course to see screen-printing as an available and easily improvised medium that can be useful in many projects and scenarios. In addition, the students will see screen-printing not as much as an end but a means to an end in their work as artists and designers.

 

GDES 391 TOP: TYPE DESIGN
May 20 - June 20, MTWR 1-3:15 p.m. | Heintzelman

This course explores typeface design as both a practice and a foundational part of contemporary graphic design. We will begin by examining the historical evolution of Latin letterforms as well as their present-day significance and usage across a variety of media. Students will complete exercises to develop their calligraphic and digital skills, and will receive training on Glyphs (www.glyphsapp.com), an industry-standard font editor for MacOS. Attention will be paid to the design of individual letterforms as well as the way in which typefaces function as cohesive systems. Working individually, and aided through a process of revision, group critique, and individual consultations with the instructor, students will then develop and digitize an original typeface. The expectation of this course is not that students will master typeface design; rather, that it might help clarify the process of making usable fonts, enhance their personal work, and serve to deepen their appreciation of the practice and of type itself.

 

GSWS 391 TOPICS: LATINA FEMINISM
July 22 - August 9, Online | MOROS

Latina Feminist Thought is a broad topic—it is philosophical, it is spiritual, it is art, and it is a genre of work in progress, but it is also very concrete, embodied, and situated in the crossroad of territorial, historical, and continued story of a community within the United States and the Americas at large. Who Latinas are and how feminism enters the conversation is much of that story. This course will focus on how the intersections of history and identity are reflected through writing, film, and visual art, as expressions of this feminist thinking. We will use the method of “testimonio,” or testimony, as a political tool that has gathered the lived experience of politically persecuted vulnerable communities in Latin America, and continues as a method of validating lived experience, or biography as text.

 

GSWS 491 TOP: LGBTQ HEALTH & WELLNESS
June 10 - July 18, Online | COSTON

Broadly, the social sciences and humanities bring a unique opportunity to connect what seem to be individual-level phenomena to the larger social world. Growing in popularity (and in necessity) is social and humanistic study of health and illness. It is becoming more widely accepted that we cannot understand the topics of health and illness, morbidity and mortality, pain and suffering, disability and ability, wellness and resiliency, etc., simply by looking at biological phenomena and medical knowledge; we must also consider a variety of social, political, economic, and cultural forces. This is particularly true for LGBTQIA+ and other targeted individuals in U.S. Society, who experience discrimination, bias, unequal access, and inequitable treatment not only from society, but also specifically from the institution of medicine. As such, this course is interdisciplinary in nature and fosters inquiry into how health and illness are defined, interpreted and socially constructed—varying over time, place, and space. Topics include, but are not limited to, an in-depth examination of the history of the medicalization and pathological of LGBTQIA+ bodies, identities, and lives; the impact of other sociopolitical locations, such as race ethnicity, social class, age, and disability, on LGBTQ health and wellness; and the impact of health policy and law, health care practices and programming, and activism on LGBTQ health and wellness. This course meets entirely online, asynchronously.

 

HIST 391 TOP: WWII US FOOD POLICY
May 20 - June 20, MTWR 10:30am - 12:45pm | Raymond

This course will explore the role of food as both an impetus for and casualty of World War II.  Students will:

  • Learn how the Axis nations’ food policy facilitated the expansion of their empires, and then their citizens’ near-starvation

  • Learn and research how the Allied nations responded with their own food programs and propaganda; and

  • Tend a Victory Garden in the VCU Learning Garden

 

HPEX 391 SP TOP: HEALTH & FITNESS
June 10 - July 10, Online | Scott

 

INFO 491 TOPICS: IS SECURITY
May 21 - July 11, RT 6-8:40pm | Robinett

IS Security: We discuss major information security concepts and how they are applied to the business. These concepts include (but are not limited to) risk management, cryptography, PKI and secure communications, secure application development, cloud computing, and contingency planning/disaster recovery. Students will also explore real-world business problems that these issues present to organizations.

 

MASC 491 TOP: HISTORY OF DOCUMENTARY
May 20 - June 20 MTWR 1-3:15pm | Bajkiewicz
We'll take an in-depth look at "reality TV" before anyone knew what that was! From the Lumière brothers at the turn of the century to "Super Size Me," we'll explore this unique art form and what it means for today's audiences. We'll watch and critique documentaries, and for the final project you'll dig deep into an aspect of doc that interests you. Open to all Mass Comm majors and Media Study minors. Counts as an upper level Mass Comm elective.

 

MHIS 291 TOP: SOUNDSCAPES: WORLD MUSIC
May 20 - August 9 Online | Alexander, Smith

Exploring World Music gives students a global sense of music and its significance across cultures by introducing them to a diverse repertoire and developing listening skills applicable to all music. By exploring sound, setting, and significance, this course facilitates comparisons of various musical styles and meanings from around the world.

 

MKTG 491 TOP: MARKETING PRACTICE AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
May 20 - August 9 TBA | Slough

Through an actual internship experience, this course provides the student an opportunity to work in a general marketing capacity with a regionally based enterprise. The internship work experience contributes to the student’s development of knowledge, skills, and abilities in a real-world context, supplementing and enriching his/her marketing and business education. The internship, whether paid or unpaid, sees the actual work performed taking place in varied organizational contexts.

Course Objectives. As a result of successfully completing this course, students will:

  • Increase their understanding of marketing principles and applications in practice

  • Gain a heightened appreciation and understanding of the importance of maintaining positive, productive working business relationships with superiors, peers, and potentially, customers and other stakeholders of the firm

  • Learn, through experience, multiple methods for implementing marketing methods and practices studied in the student’s VCU Business curriculum

  • Learn to habitually document in writing business goals, outcomes, and lessons learned through the course’s journaling requirement

  • Further develop written and oral communication skills through journaling and end-of-course presentations

 

PSYC 491 TOP: CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
May 20 - June 7 Online | Dzokoto

The study of cultural effects on human behavior. Examines diversity in human behavior at a global level and the reasons for such diversity. This course examines theoretical perspectives in cross-cultural psychology and cover topics including language and communication, cognition, emotions, developmental processes, social and group interactions, and mental and physical health. This course attends to cultural differences and influences on human behavior across different cultures and cultural groups.

 

SOCY 391 TOP: PUBLIC SOCIOLOGY
May 20 - June 7 Online | Katz

Sociology majors, see departmental email communications for more information.